Archive for the ‘Windows’ Category

Netsh IPv6 cheat sheet

Thursday, January 28th, 2010

This is a short post, which may not add a lot of value (hopefully it’s helpful at least a little).  While attending an IPv6 training session, netsh was referred to and I started looking at it.  I haven’t done a lot with IPv6 up to this point, so haven’t been familiar with the plenitude of information available within netsh.

Well, I started to play around with netsh and was somewhat overwhelmed by the number of commands.  After messing around with it for awhile, I found that most of the commands provided little (if any) benefit to me, however the following commands looked like they’d be useful, so I decided to jot them down.

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Sony Vaio VGN-TXN25N/B review…

Monday, May 14th, 2007

I just bought a Sony Vaio VGN-TXN25N/B from a retailer that was closing its doors (deeply discounted!).  I’ve been wanting a sub-notebook for a long time, but didn’t want to spend the additional money subs usually demand.  Out of the major sub-notebook manufacturers, Sony seems to have the smallest footprint and features if you’re truly wanting a portable work horse.  The weight (2.8lbs), size (11.1″ screen) and battery life (4+ hours, average of 5+ hours so I’ve heard) make it a winner for a practical, portable system. (more…)

HOWTO dual-boot between Linux and Windows using GRUB

Tuesday, May 8th, 2007

When I first started out with Linux, I wasn’t aware of some of the issues that can arise with dual-booting Windows with another OS.  The following ramblings are some of my experiences/findings. (more…)

NT/2000 Event Log Archiver & Viewing System

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2005

OBSELENCE NOTE: This was written well over a year ago, so may be outdated (ie. may have broken links — if so, let me know and I’ll update).  Just because it’s old doesn’t mean that it’s not worth sharing!

Summary:

There are lots of products out there that allow you to remotely view your NT/2000-based event logs.  Not many of these allow for an archival and later viewing of these events.  If you look for something free, it really narrows the field down — so I wrote a program that would archive NT/2000 event logs to a SQL database.

After I had them archived, I noticed that my SQL database was really filling up fast.  I decided to code the ability to export certain events from the SQL DB to an XML file, allowing the file to be burned to a CD/DVD for archival.

Well, now I’ve got a 600MB XML file, and no way to view it.  Naturally, I wrote a program that would view and print the XML file as if you were looking directly at the NT/2000 event log itself.

Obviously there are several pieces to the big picture:

  1. The archiver (reads event log entries – stores them in the SQL DB – exports events to XML file).
  2. The viewer (reads XML file for viewing/printing).
  3. The SQL DB (plan on having a lot of space taken up by these logs).

NOTE: You need to have the MS XML parser installed on the machine that you run any of the first two above programs on to have them work.  If you’re looking for the MS XML Parser 4.0 SP2, go to http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=3144b72b-b4f2-46da-b4b6-c5d7485f2b42&displaylang=en.

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Online Requisition System (ORS)

Thursday, January 13th, 2005

OBSELENCE NOTE: This was written well over a year ago, so may be outdated (ie. may have broken links — if so, let me know and I’ll update).  Just because it’s old doesn’t mean that it’s not worth sharing!

Summary:

THIS PAGE IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION AND MAY BE INCOMPLETE

This is a requisition and PO management system that I built.  The ORS interfaces with Meditech’s data repository (DR) to provide accurate shipping and status from the Meditech system itself (assuming that your site has Materials Management (MM)).  The system could still be used if you don’t have Meditech, but quite a bit of the code would have to be modified (it was originally designed to tightly integrate with Meditech).

Each user is authenticated against a Windows NT/2000 domain.  Group permission can be setup by the NT group that the user is a member of (mapping NT groups to the appropriate ORS groups requires a manual initial mapping).  There are system-wide limits for how much can be ordered without a super-user’s signature, etc.

Another added bonus for this system is the digital signature component’s integration with digital tablets.  I chose to use the ePad tablets (when originally designed, the only ePad tablets around were serial-based — you could probably get by using the USB just as easily).  The only catch is that the proper Windows drivers must be configured on the workstation that has the ePad for the digital signature piece to work properly (digital signatures need only be received from super-users — people who approve purchases over set limits within the system).

For more info, read over the docs below (go to the downloads section below).

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Windows 2000/2003 Directory Services Audit Logging Management Utility

Thursday, January 13th, 2005

Summary:

There’s a way to get very detailed event logging features for core Active Directory services.  Unfortunately, there’s no GUI for doing this — you have to dig in the registry to do it.  This can be cumbersome if you’ve got a list of servers to monitor/diagnose.  This tools allows you to specify a server, select which Active Directory service to log and what logging level it should be set at.

See http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;314980&sd=tech for more information on the registry keys and values.

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Adding Context Options for All File Types in Windows

Thursday, January 13th, 2005

Summary:

I often times have the need to open a file and see what’s really inside it, not open the file in what it’s associated with in Windows.  Sometimes I might want to see the plain text value (ie. open the file in Notepad or some other text editor) or view it in a hex editor.  Either way, adding your favorite editor, or any other program you might want to open the file in is very easy.

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NT Authentication DLL

Thursday, January 13th, 2005

OBSELENCE NOTE: This was written well over a year ago, so may be outdated (ie. may have broken links — if so, let me know and I’ll update).  Just because it’s old doesn’t mean that it’s not worth sharing!

Summary:

How many times have you had a program that you need to authenticate users?  Most programs today require authentication at some point or another.  You have two solutions: use an existing authentication mechanism or re-create the wheel (make your own).

Sometimes it’s best to re-create the wheel, but for most apps (especially in-house, home-brewn apps) this simply results in another username/password combo that end-users will simply forget.  The bottom line: more work for you (or whoever’s maintaining the system) because you’ll be getting complaints from users and having to reset their passwords all the time.  Then, to make things better, you notice that people are leaving sticky notes on their monitors with their usernames/passwords to these programs.  Maybe you’d better think about using an existing authentication system.  May I encourage you to use NT authentication!

If you have a Windows environment (domain), you already have the usernames & passwords created with a system that enforces all of your companies account policies (expiration, lockout, password change interval, etc.).  Simply check the usernames and passwords provided against NT.  This DLL provides one way of doing this.  Maybe there’s a better way.  In fact, I’m almost sure there is, but this works for me.  If you have a better way, please email me — tclegg at ovhd.com.

As a bonus, this DLL also is useful for getting NT group membership.  One function allows you to provide the group name and it will enumerate all of the users in that group.  Another group function takes a username and lists all groups that the user belongs to.  Note that these are domain (global) groups, not local groups.

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